Good Start Packaging Helps Reduce the Environmental Impact of Takeout Food

The National Restaurant Association says that the sudden rise in takeout orders due to the COVID pandemic was not a temporary phenomenon. The organization conducted a 2022 study and found that 54% of adults (including 72% of millennials) believe takeout food is an essential part of their daily lives.

Although takeout was a crucial way to help businesses during the pandemic it has also been costly to the environment. The European-based Marine Litter Lab discovered that 44% of plastics polluting oceans are made from takeout containers.

Good Start Packaging Helps Reduce the Environmental Impact of Takeout Food

Good Start Packaging has set out to eliminate disposable plastics from foodservice businesses. It has been a leader in North America for compostable alternatives to plastic takeout containers and restaurant supplies since its founding in 2009.

Ken Jacobus, founder, and CEO of Good Start Packaging stated that the company’s goal was to reduce our collective dependence on disposable plastic and help our clients build sustainable, profitable businesses. Good Start Packaging products are made with renewable resources like corn, sugarcane fiber, bamboo, and recycled paper. They do not contain toxic chemicals and use fewer manufacturing resources.

Good Start Packaging products can be disposed of in commercial facilities within two to four months. This creates soil that can be sold to landscape and garden centers. Jacobus explains that most compostable containers won’t break down in a home composting area because it doesn’t heat up enough. The packaging is still better for the environment due to the sustainable practices they were created.

Earth Day 2022

Good Start Packaging urges foodservice operators to look at alternatives to plastic takeout material for Earth Day 2022. “Earthday.org’s End plastics pollution campaign was launched in 2018. This campaign aims to eliminate single-use plastics, and supports regulations regarding the disposal of plastics. With COVID, plastic packaging usage soared. Jacobus says it is important to refocus our commitment to sustainable solutions.